TIdelift Subscriber Badge

I’d would also (To second @nedbat’s comment) like to see company’s display a Tidelift badge if they’re a Subscriber supporting the Open Source community. When evaluating company’s, I look into whether the company is leveraging Open Source in their stack, and to what extent they’re engaged with the Open Source community (code contributions, financial backing, etc.).

Active engagement gives me the confidence that:

  • The company is striving to remain on the cutting edge of technology.
  • Should the company cease, another company could build a similar service on the same Open Source, reducing the risk of disruption to my life.
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Tying into this badge is possibly stating how many full time developers are reported by the company if they want. Larger companies that want to dip their toe in, so to speak, can set up a tidelift subscription for just one team, but ‘we have lots of developers!’ might be something companies want to communicate, in the form of having a badge showing that they have a tidelift subscription for all their devs.

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This is really great feedback (thank you!) and definitely something for us to think about. I’ll post back with more questions/requests for feedback as we have them, but if anyone else has thoughts or ideas on this, please share!

Actually, getting the list of all Open Source friendly companies looking for people in my region is hard. Not only Tidelift subscription is important, but also if they have the Open Source policy that permits contributing code upstream. In many outsourcing companies all code that you write belongs to the business and that creates problems which result in different CLA, DCO and other legal headaches for Open Source projects and their contributors.

While Tidelift Subscriber Badge is important for recruiting departments and company marketing, it is also important to have an up-to-date public dataset of company profiles, which includes fields like if the company has friendly Open Source policy (with a checklist what it means), donation matching programs, free venues for Open Source projects to hold meetups and coding meetings, and other bonuses related to Tidelift mission.

I should have clarified my statement a little more. I evaluate company’s with the goal of purchasing products and services (such as an e-mail provider, budgeting app, etc.).

@abitrolly brought up a good point here. Being a Tidelift subscriber does not mean the company contributes back to Open Source beyond the financial contributions made through their Subscription.